How To Get Subscribers On YouTube

how to get subscribers on YouTube
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  • December 29, 2020
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1. Upload at least one video per week.

One of the most important steps in getting more subscribers is to provide content as much as you can. The more videos you have, the more popular your channel will be and the more videos you post, the more people will come back to your channel.

More videos mean more search results, which will lead to more subscribers.

Don’t think that posting too many videos each week will get in the way of your channel and make it difficult for viewers to find what they’re looking for.

  1. Set a schedule and stick to it.

Try to upload your videos at regular times throughout the month or week. Let your subscribers know when your next video is, then they are more likely to come back to your channel when the video is posted.

Viewers are more likely to subscribe to a channel that regularly produces content than a channel that uploads a clip every indefinitely.

Consider doing a live broadcast of your videos so that you can interact with the audience watching you in real time. In YouTube search results, live videos rank higher, especially when they are broadcast.

 

Add keywords (hashtags) to your videos correctly. Ensure that all keywords match the content of the videos. If someone searches for something and your video shows up because their keywords are incorrect, they will leave after a few seconds, and most likely never come back.

Good keywords will ensure that your videos appear in related searches.

Use multi-word and single-word keywords.

People often search for complete phrases.

Use a maximum of 15 keywords for the video. If you exceed this limit, the YouTube channel will ignore all the keywords you added and may not show the video in search results.

Use keywords people use while searching. Some applications and websites such as: hashtag4follows.com may help you find those keywords

3. Spend some time writing a good headline.

 

A video with a good title appears much more in the search results list than clips with a bad title. For example, let’s say you’re making a video about baking cookies. A bad title for this video might be “Good Biscuit Bread”. While a good title would be “Bake delicious, crunchy biscuits in less than 15 minutes”.

The second title describes the content more, and contains more keywords that help to find it by search engines.

Some popular accounts on the YouTube channel use the so-called clickbait, which is basically a video title that attracts the viewer to click on the video to learn more. Examples of such headlines are: “You will be shocked by what will happen” or “You won’t believe when you see what this person can do.” This is a good trick to get more subscribers, but it can also piss some people off if you don’t meet their high expectations.

5. Write a meaningful description.

It will only show the first few lines of your description when the video appears in search, so make sure that the beginning of the description explains the video and what the viewer will see well.

Make sure you include a good number of keywords in your description, but don’t overdo it and make it hard to read.

Ask your viewers to subscribe to your channel and provide a link to the channel in the description.

 

Part 2:

  1. Write a script.

While spur of the moment videos can very well be successful, preparing a script will help you deliver a consistent programming schedule. The script will prevent you from deviating from the topic of the video, as well as help to define your content for your viewers.

In the case of a vlog, you may want to make a plan of what you want to say and get going. Some of the best vloggers do this and then cut the shot while they hum.

  1. Film what you know.

The most successful video is the one you shoot doing what you love. Don’t try to follow others and make videos that mimic the trend of the audience. You will become much more successful if you do what you want to do, and focus on refining it

 

Start with a sneak peek. The introduction is one of the most important parts of the video. It should grab the viewer’s attention, show the theme and direction of the video, and keep the viewer looking forward to watching the video. You can do this with a personal introduction, graphics, clips from video content, and more.

Balance the strength of the introduction with its brevity. The audience is not likely to wait more than 10-15 seconds watching the introduction. This includes titles, graphics, and editorials. Grab their attention quickly and then start diving into the main content of the video.

  1. 3. Add keywords (hashtags) to your videos correctly.

Ensure that all keywords match the content of the videos. If someone searches for something and your video shows up because their keywords are incorrect, they will leave after a few seconds, and most likely never come back.

Good keywords will ensure that your videos appear in related searches.

Use multi-word and single-word keywords. People often search for complete phrases.

Use a maximum of 15 keywords for the video. If you exceed this limit, the YouTube channel will ignore all the keywords you added and may not show the video in search results.

Use keywords people use while searching. Some apps and websites like: hashtag4follows.com may help you find these keywords.

  1. Start with a sneak peek.

The introduction is one of the most important parts of the video. It should grab the viewer’s attention, show the theme and direction of the video, and keep the viewer looking forward to watching the video. You can do this with a personal introduction, graphics, clips from video content, and more.

Balance the strength of the introduction with its brevity. The audience is not likely to wait more than 10-15 seconds watching the introduction. This includes titles, graphics, and editorials. Grab their attention quickly and then start diving into the main content of the video.

  1. 4. Set the pace for your

It is essential that the speed of your video spares the viewer from boredom. Don’t dwell on uninteresting topics, and keep progressing.

Don’t try to stuff too much information into one part. If you’re producing educational videos, consider splitting the content into multiple parts. This will not make the viewer overburdened with information.

On the other hand, make sure you have enough content to fill the duration of the video. If the viewer becomes uninterested, even for a second, they will likely leave to look for another video.

For longer videos, add short breaks when the pace of the content slows down a bit. This will give the viewer a moment to think about what they’ve seen so far before you complete your content.

  1. End the video with a request.

At the end of your video, don’t say goodbye and turn the camera. Ask your viewers to subscribe to your channel, share your videos on Facebook, or ask them to leave comments below the video. All of this will lead to more subscriptions, and more interaction from your subscribers.

Add notes with a subscribe button inside the video. Make sure it doesn’t block any part, and keep it for the final break.[1]

 

Part 3

Produce your own clips

  1. Format your videos.

Even basic formats can help distinguish a video from the thousands of similar videos on YouTube. Coordinate all lulls, bugs, or bad content.

Spend some time learning how to use video editing software. There are many open source video editing software available for free, and many camcorders come with video editing software.

 

  1. Develop transitional shots.

If you want to produce a series of videos based on the same general concept (tutorials, rating reviews, etc.), create transitions and cross-effects that can be applied to all of your videos. This will give a unified impression to your content, making it look more professional to the viewer.

Transition shots have a huge impact on video highlighting. Your personality is a very important aspect of the success of your YouTube channel, so make sure you polish it as much as possible.

 

  1. Practice working with the camera.

Try different types of shots. Get to know the camera inside and out. Smooth camera work does wonders to keep your subscribers.

Avoid moving the camera around too much, unless it’s a specific feeling you’re working on. For example, if you are talking to the camera, and then you want to focus on the table for example, do not shoot while the camera is moving. Instead, clip from one shot to the next so the viewer doesn’t experience any jarring of camera movement.

Get a friend or family member in for help. Having someone dedicated to operating the camera can set you free so you can look more good in front of the camera. Having a “crew” also adds an air of professionalism to the production process, rather than just using your webcam to shoot the video.

Use a tripod or regular mount where possible to ensure image stability, and if you will be moving with the camera, use a pocket or optical stabilizer.

 

Part 4:

Creating your channel

 

  1. Keep your content consistent.

 Ensure that the content you add to your channel is consistent with your channel’s theme. For example, if you start out by releasing a bunch of review clips, don’t move on to uploading recipe videos at a later time. You will lose subscribers if they find that your content does not match their expectations.

Create multiple channels for different topics and different themed. This will allow you to link between your channels and keep the different content separate so you don’t confuse viewers.

 

  1. Interact with your subscribers.

Responding to good comments and giving your opinions to subscribers in snapshots within videos will really help to strengthen your channel community.

Make sure to manage your channel as well, and delete any bad messages that might irritate other subscribers. This will keep your channel friendly and popular.

 

  1. Subscribe to other channels.

Find and subscribe to channels that share your interests. Leave a thoughtful and well written comment, and soon you will find subscribers of that channel flocking to your channel as well. YouTube is a community, and interacting with it helps you grow much more than just uploading videos.

Upload videos to respond to other videos if appropriate, but avoid sending unwanted videos to other channels. You will likely be ignored and banned, which will hurt your chances of getting subscribers. Treat other channels with respect, and you’ll notice your progress.

  1. Leave positive comments on other people’s videos.

Just make sure the comments are relevant and not random or annoying

Advertise your channel. Use other social media such as Facebook and Twitter to advertise your channel. Tell your friends and followers that you’ve uploaded a new video. Write a quick comment about the video when you post.

If you have a blog, put a direct link to your YouTube channel so that readers can easily find your video. Simply use the following programming code to create a marginal bar to subscribe to a YouTube channel:

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